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feed MATHS

Mathematics helps children make sense of the world around them and find meaning in the physical world. Through mathematics, children learn to understand their world in terms of numbers and shapes. They learn to reason, to connect ideas, and to think logically. Mathematics is more than the rules and operations we learned in school. It is about connections and seeing relationships in everything we do.

Children learn best when they are interested and even excited about what they are doing. As a parent, you have the special opportunity to make the most of the moments during the day when your children are curious. Toddlers may just point to objects saying "dat?" to ask what it is. Describe it for them, "Oh, that's a pink flower" or "the chair has a square seat." As your children get older, they may ask "how many?" or "what color. . . ?" These questions encourage children to think. Teachers and schools must plan activities, but you don't have to plan in advance. Just take advantage of learning opportunities that happen naturally. You can turn these times into teachable moments. When you use daily events that have meaning to your children, the impact is very powerful.

Give your children many opportunities to see and hear different things, and to move about and play with things they can touch. Let them collect things, and show you and tell you things in their own way. You don't have to "teach" your children facts or math rules or even organize their mathematical learning. Rather, encourage them to ask questions-- questions that require more than a simple yes or no, like "what would happen if. . . ?" Encourage children to think. Also, ask them questions and allow them to explore different ways of solving problems. If they seem to be going way off the mark, lead them back by starting with the part of their approach that was logical. Always show respect for their thinking and accept their point of view. Remember, children think much differently than adults. Take your time. Children, including those with special needs, tire easily. It is better to go lightly and keep their interest than to push too hard.



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POP for Addition & Subtraction

The Pop for Addition and Subtraction is a fast-paced maths game that lets you spin to practice basic facts—keep the gumballs for right answers. This early maths game is ideal for practicing vital early maths skills. The sums are never bigger than ten, but
R190.00 R0.00
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0 stars  Total votes: 0

POP for Counting™ Game

Practise counting with this entertaining grab-and-go game!
R190.00 R0.00
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0 stars  Total votes: 0

POP for Shapes™ Game

Practise shape recognition with this entertaining grab-and-go game!
R190.00 R0.00
Average customer rating:
0 stars  Total votes: 0